Training leading to real jobs: Major Appliance Service Technology

Schweriners Rep. H. Paul with Appliance Tech Class

 

Major Appliance Service Technology students at the Hughes Unit in Gatesville learn mechanical, electrical and electronic principles related to the diagnosis, service and repair of major appliances. This Windham School District program allows vocational students to work with home appliances such as automatic washing machines and dishwashers, microwaves, and others. Offenders can earn industry certification valuable for post-release employment, such as the Environmental Protection Agency 608 Approved Refrigerant Handling and Recovery, NASTeC and OSHA. Students are shown with (l. to r.) teacher D. Nixon, Director J. Rankin of Central Texas College Center (Gatesville/TDCJ), WSD Superintendent Dr. C. Carpenter, the WSD Principal  and (center) State Senator Charles Schwertner’s District Representative H. Paul.

 

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WSD & TDCJ: Gatesville tour for Governor's staff focuses on partnerships, successful re-entry efforts - Board of Trustees Chairman Dale Wainwright and Windham School District staff hosted eight members of Governor Greg Abbott's staff for a tour of the Woodman State Jail and maximum security Hughes Unit. They were joined by Chairman of the Board of Pardons and Parole David Gutierrez and other leadership from the Texas Department of Criminal Justice.

GED® Test Changing / Cambios en el examen para GED® - If you qualify for the GED®, take the paper-based test and pass while you still have the opportunity.

Annual Performance Report SY15 (014-2015)

This is an exciting time to be part of Windham School District (WSD)!

We invite you to be a part of what is happening to change lives for those wanting a second chance after a past of criminal activity. Every day, more people join our efforts to change the lives of those incarcerated in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. “New teachers apply for jobs, volunteers sign up to devote time and some offer free short courses, businesses inquire about hiring students on release, and many charitable service and faith-based organizations ask to partner with WSD.” Many Texans are now interested in how they can become a part of our collective effort, making Windham’s goals part of their personal mission. We are hearing these people proudly state, “We are Windham,” expressing solidarity with our common mission to facilitate positive change.

Windham’s past performance is ranked as one of the highest in the nation among correctional educational programs, but we know we must continue to improve and challenge ourselves to deliver the best opportunities for offenders to be successful upon release back into Texas communities. Windham takes pride in past performance, but I hope you can also see our efforts to be responsive to needed changes. Our staff of highly qualified and dedicated people is rising to the challenges of educating the offender population in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. By improving educational content delivery, expanding vocational training opportunity for offenders, improving behavior and choice training for offenders, connecting with businesses who employ released offenders and continually working to improve efficiencies, Windham is providing a cost-effective intervention that helps protect all fellow Texans and lowers the cost of criminal activity to the State.

 

Current APR 2014 - 2015: 

 

Archived Reports: 

 

 

Message of appreciation from Chairman Oliver Bell and WSD Board of Trustees - On behalf of the Windham School Board of Trustees, I'd like to express appreciation to the Windham School District and the professional employees who provide instruction and training to offenders incarcerated in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. WSD teachers impact lives while educating offenders; they provide opportunities and they give praise; they help build self-esteem.

Austin businesswoman lists education, faith, sobriety as powerful life savers - Education, faith, sobriety and determination rewrote the dramatic story of Austin's Tina Harryman, a successful businesswoman who overcame substance abuse and incarceration.